This tutorial will guide you through the creation of steps in your process that allow for date formatting. There are two modes allowed: formatting a single date or formatting multiple dates with one request.

You can also use our step templates to create the required steps

Step 1: Create Date Input

Access your process and create an action step at the right point in the process. Add a "Date Input" action to the step.


Step 2: Create the date formatting step

Create an integration step. Make sure it is created at some point in the process after the date input step. Configure the integration step:

choose method POST and URL

https://integrations.nextmatter.com/g/utils/formatdate

Headers:

Key

Value

Content-Type

application/json

Body for single date formatting

{ "date": "[use the data references feature to get the date from the

previous step]",

"format_string": "%d.%m.%Y" }

Body for multiple date formatting

[{"date": "[use the data references feature to get the date from the

previous step]",

"format_string": "%d.%m.%Y"},
{"date": "[use the data references feature to get the date from the

previous step]",

"format_string": "%d.%m.%Y"}, ...]

replace the "..." with the same structure to format as many dates as needed.

You can use the formatted date in later steps by using data referencing. For formatting multiple dates, you need to make the result available by adding values in "Response data for use in later steps" as below

Name

Value

formatted_date_1

$.[0]

formatted_date_2

$.[1]

add more for each formatted date

You can change the date format to any desired format by changing the "format_string". Follow the table below to get your custom format string

examples:

03/March/2021 - %d/%B/%Y

03.03.21 - %d/%m/%y

Directive

Meaning

Example

%a

Weekday as locale’s abbreviated name.

Sun, Mon, …, Sat (en_US);

So, Mo, …, Sa (de_DE)

%A

Weekday as locale’s full name.

Sunday, Monday, …, Saturday (en_US);

Sonntag, Montag, …, Samstag (de_DE)

%w

Weekday as a decimal number, where 0 is Sunday and 6 is Saturday.

0, 1, …, 6

%d

Day of the month as a zero-padded decimal number.

01, 02, …, 31

%b

Month as locale’s abbreviated name.

Jan, Feb, …, Dec (en_US);

Jan, Feb, …, Dez (de_DE)

%B

Month as locale’s full name.

January, February, …, December (en_US);

Januar, Februar, …, Dezember (de_DE)

%m

Month as a zero-padded decimal number.

01, 02, …, 12

%y

Year without century as a zero-padded decimal number.

00, 01, …, 99

%Y

Year with century as a decimal number.

0001, 0002, …, 2013, 2014, …, 9998, 9999

%H

Hour (24-hour clock) as a zero-padded decimal number.

00, 01, …, 23

%I

Hour (12-hour clock) as a zero-padded decimal number.

01, 02, …, 12

%p

Locale’s equivalent of either AM or PM.

AM, PM (en_US);

am, pm (de_DE)

%M

Minute as a zero-padded decimal number.

00, 01, …, 59

%S

Second as a zero-padded decimal number.

00, 01, …, 59

%f

Microsecond as a decimal number, zero-padded on the left.

000000, 000001, …, 999999

%z

UTC offset in the form±HHMM[SS[.ffffff]] (empty string if the object is naive).

(empty), +0000, -0400, +1030, +063415, -030712.345216

%Z

Time zone name (empty string if the object is naive).

(empty), UTC, GMT

%j

Day of the year as a zero-padded decimal number.

001, 002, …, 366

%U

Week number of the year (Sunday as the first day of the week) as a zero padded decimal number. All days in a new year preceding the first Sunday are considered to be in week 0.

00, 01, …, 53

%W

Week number of the year (Monday as the first day of the week) as a decimal number. All days in a new year preceding the first Monday are considered to be in week 0.

00, 01, …, 53

%c

Locale’s appropriate date and time representation.

Tue Aug 16 21:30:00 1988 (en_US);

Di 16 Aug 21:30:00 1988 (de_DE)

%x

Locale’s appropriate date representation.

08/16/88 (None);

08/16/1988 (en_US);

16.08.1988 (de_DE)

%X

Locale’s appropriate time representation.

21:30:00 (en_US);

21:30:00 (de_DE)

%%

A literal '%' character.

%

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